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Open Lane Changes

April 21, 2012 3 comments

My Open Lane application has undergone some significant changes. I’ve added:

  1. Entity classes for a swim meet and events within the meet.
  2. Enumerators for Gender and Stroke.
  3. An AgeGroup class to encapsulate an event’s age category.
  4. JSF DataModel subclasses for Meet and Event along with a refactored SignUp backing bean.
  5. JPA services for all data input and output.
  6. JSF Converter classes for Gender, Stroke, and AgeGroup.
  7. CSV file initialization functions to populate the Swimmer, Meet, Event, and User tables.

Gender and stroke each represent a fixed set of constants which can be objectified in Java as an enumerator. An enumerator provides a clean, self-documenting, and an efficient way of coding an object model. Java enumerators can also be used to encapsulated conversion functionality.

In the case of this application the meet, event, swimmer, and entry records are imported from a CSV file. Within the event record is a stroke (i.e. Freestyle, Backstroke) filed that is coded using a number.  A “1” represents Freestyle, a “2” represents Backstroke, and so on. Stroke has been coded so that each enumerator has its import field number code associated with it. During the import process a simple call to Stroke.parse(string) generates the correct enumerator.

Instead of putting parse into Stroke I could have created a distinct converter. That would have been a cleaner separation of the code. But I don’t anticipate the conversion changing or needing to be adaptable. This way the code is simpler and straight forward.

Stroke.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.data.model;

public enum Stroke {
    FREE("1"),
    BACK("2"),
    BREAST("3"),
    FLY("4"),
    IM("5");

    private String code;

    Stroke(String code) {
    	this.code = code;
    }

     public String getCode() {
          return code;
     }

     public void setCode(String code) {
          this.code = code;
     }

    public static Stroke parse(String string) {
    	Stroke result = null;

    	for (Stroke stroke : Stroke.values() ) {
    		if (stroke.getCode().equalsIgnoreCase(string)) {
				result = stroke;
				break;
			}
		}

		return result;
    }
}

This is an example of using the Gender enumerator within a JPA query to abstract away the codes used in the database. I don’t have to concern myself with how the data is coded once it is imported into the database.

em.createQuery("select e from Event e where e.meet = :meet and (e.gender = :mixed or e.gender = :gender")
.setParameter("meet", meet)
.setParameter("mixed", Gender.MIXED)
.setParameter("gender", gender)
.getResultList();
 

Later in this article is an example of how the enumerator’s parse method is used.

Eventually the JSF tables will support sorting and paging. In preparation for that I’ve moved from List and Collection to JSF’s DataModel. DataModel is a wrapper that abstracts the underlying data. I’ve also used it to store which record (object) may have been selected by the user. Previously there was an independent bean to handle that. Putting it here keeps thing a bit tidier. I created DataModel’s for Event and Meet. Later I’ll reuse the pattern for a user’s open lane applications.

I’ve decided to build out services for each entity in the data model. This provides a level of encapsulation and organization that make the code more manageable. Using @Autowired I can also create services that are built upon other services. For example, the SignUpService uses the SwimmerService.

SignUpService.java snippet.

@Service("signupService")
@Repository
public class SignUpServiceImpl implements SignUpService, Serializable {

     private EntityManager em;
     @Autowired
     private SwimmerService swimmerService;

    @PersistenceContext
    public void setEntityManager(EntityManager em) {
    	this.em = em;
    }
….
    @Transactional
     public Boolean doSignUp(SignUp signUp) {
     Boolean result = Boolean.FALSE;

     Swimmer swimmer = swimmerService.findSwimmer(signUp.getUsasId());

As a general rule the code should have a clean separation between how data is represented internally and externally. JSF’s Converter class is one way to accomplish that. I needed a Converter for Gender, Stroke, and AgeGroup. Since Gender and Stroke were enumerators I create an abstract base class to simplify things. The Gender and Stroke converters need only supply the mappings between the internal representation (an enumerator) and string (display value).

AbstractEnumConverter.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.faces.converter;

import java.util.Hashtable;
import java.util.Map;

import javax.faces.component.UIComponent;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.faces.convert.Converter;

public abstract class AbstractEnumConverter<T> implements Converter {
	private final static int ASSOCIATION_ENUM	= 0;
	private final static int ASSOCIATION_STRING	= 1;

	private Class<T> clazz;
	private final Map<T, String> toStringMap = new Hashtable<T, String>();
	private final Map<String, T> toEnumMap = new Hashtable<String, T>();

	@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
	public AbstractEnumConverter(Class<T> clazz, Object[][] associations) {
		this.clazz = clazz;

		for (Object[] association : associations) {
			toEnumMap.put((String) association[ASSOCIATION_STRING], (T) association[ASSOCIATION_ENUM]);
			toStringMap.put((T) association[ASSOCIATION_ENUM], (String) association[ASSOCIATION_STRING]);
		}
	}

	public Object getAsObject(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, String value) {
		return toEnumMap.get(value);
	}

	@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
	public String getAsString(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, Object value) {
            if (value.getClass() == clazz) {
        	 return toStringMap.get((T) value);
            }
            else
            {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format("Cannot convert object - not of type %s", clazz.getSimpleName()));
            }
	}
}

StrokeConverter.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.faces.converter;

import javax.faces.convert.FacesConverter;
import org.bwgz.swim.openlane.data.model.Stroke;

@FacesConverter(value="strokeConverter")
public class StrokeConverter extends AbstractEnumConverter<Stroke> {
	private final static Object associations[][] = {
		{ Stroke.FREE,		"Free" },
		{ Stroke.BACK,		"Back" },
		{ Stroke.BREAST,	"Breast" },
		{ Stroke.FLY,		"Fly" },
		{ Stroke.IM,		"IM" },
	};

	public StrokeConverter() {
		super(Stroke.class, associations);
	}
}

The AgeGroup converter encapsulates the four rules used to describe an age category.

AgeGroupConverter.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.faces.converter;

import javax.faces.component.UIComponent;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.faces.convert.Converter;
import javax.faces.convert.FacesConverter;

import org.bwgz.swim.openlane.data.model.AgeGroup;

@FacesConverter(value="ageGroupConverter")
public class AgeGroupConverter implements Converter {
	private static final String SENIOR		= "Senior";
	private static final String UNDER		= "Under";
	private static final String OVER		= "Over";
	private static final String AMPERSAND	= "&";
	private static final String HYPHEN		= "-";

	private static final int LEFT	= 0;
	private static final int RIGHT	= 1;

	private Object getAsObject(String string) {
		long min = 0;
		long max = 0;

		if (string.equals(SENIOR)) {
			min = 0;
			max = 0;
		}
		else if (string.contains(AMPERSAND)) {
			String[] fields = string.split(AMPERSAND);

			if (fields[RIGHT].equals(UNDER)) {
				min = 0;
				max = Long.parseLong(fields[LEFT]);
			}
			else if (fields[RIGHT].equals(OVER)) {
				min = Long.parseLong(fields[LEFT]);
				max = 0;
			}
		}
		else if (string.contains(HYPHEN)) {
			String[] fields = string.split(HYPHEN);

			min = Long.parseLong(fields[LEFT]);
			max = Long.parseLong(fields[RIGHT]);
		}

		return new AgeGroup(min, max);
	}

	public Object getAsObject(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, String value) {
		return getAsObject(value);
	}

	private String getAsString(AgeGroup ageGroup) {
		String string;

		if (ageGroup.getMin() == 0 & ageGroup.getMax() == 0) {
			string = SENIOR;
		}
		else {
			String left;
			String seperator;
			String right;

			if (ageGroup.getMin() == 0) {
				left = String.valueOf(ageGroup.getMax());
				seperator = AMPERSAND;
				right = UNDER;
			}
			else if (ageGroup.getMax() == 0) {
				left = String.valueOf(ageGroup.getMin());
				seperator = AMPERSAND;
				right = OVER;
			}
			else {
				left = String.valueOf(ageGroup.getMin());
				seperator = HYPHEN;
				right = String.valueOf(ageGroup.getMax());
			}

			string = left + seperator + right;
		}

		return string;
	}

	public String getAsString(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, Object value) {
            if (value instanceof AgeGroup) {
                return getAsString((AgeGroup) value);
            }
            else
            {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Cannot convert object - not of type AgeGroup");
            }
	}
}

Meet, event, swimmer, and later entry records are imported from another system. Unfortunately the limitations of that system prevent the application from accessing them directly. Instead the data is exported to CSV files and then imported into the application.

Eventually I’ve incorporate a form of file upload within the application to provide live data import. For now some dummy (test) CSV files are included in the application and imported when the application is first accessed. Some services now have an initialize method. When called the method will read a CSV file and write the data to the database using JPA.

Using <on-start> within home-flow.xml I trigger the initializations. This is a hack for testing purposes only.

home-flow.xml snippet

<on-start>
        <evaluate expression="swimmerService.initialize()" />
        <evaluate expression="meetService.initialize()" />
        <evaluate expression="signupService.initialize()" />
</on-start>

I use FlatPack to process the CSV files. It’s a nice CSV library that I’ve used many times in the past. I particularly like that it allows you to create a map of the column names. On the other hand the map requires names for every column. This can be a bit tedious when you only need the first few columns. It can also choke when the file contains records with differing number of columns.

SwimmerServiceImpl.java snippet.

    @Transactional
    public void initialize() {
    if (!initialized) {
        DataSet dataSet;

        Parser parser;
        parser = DefaultParserFactory.getInstance().newDelimitedParser(
            new InputStreamReader(this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("/test/data/athlete.pzmap.xml")), // xml column mapping
            new InputStreamReader(this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("/test/data/athlete.csv")),  // csv file to parse
            ';', // delimiter
             '"', // text qualfier
             false); // ignore the first record (may need to be done if first record contain column names)

            dataSet = parser.parse();
            while (dataSet.next()) {
                Swimmer swimmer = new Swimmer();

                swimmer.setId(dataSet.getString("Reg_ID"));
                swimmer.setFirst(dataSet.getString("First_name"));
                swimmer.setLast(dataSet.getString("Last_name"));
                swimmer.setGender(Gender.parse(dataSet.getString("Ath_Sex")));
                swimmer.setId(dataSet.getString("Reg_ID"));
                swimmer.setBirthdate(stringToDate(dataSet.getString("Birth_date")));

                em.persist(swimmer);
                }

            initialized = true;
        }
     }
 

The code is available here on GitHub.

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Open Lane Sign Up

April 17, 2012 Leave a comment

Time for Open Lane to get more real with a user sign up feature. The application already has some user management along with authentication and authorization. Now it needs the ability for someone to sign up and create a user account. Here’s what needs to change.

Add a table and service for all eligible users (swimmers). It contains an unique identifier for each swimmer along with important name and demographic information. The data for this table is loaded from another system and should exist prior to a user attempting to sign up. The sign up process involves gathering some additional information and associating (linking) the user account with their pre-existing swimmer data.

I created entity and service classes to deal with this data. These classes cover the basics.

Swimmer.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.Date;

import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.Table;

@Entity
@Table(name = "Swimmers")
public class Swimmer implements Serializable {
	private static final long serialVersionUID = 1816256078842365678L;

	private String id;
	private String first;
	private String last;
	private String middle;
	private String gender;
	private Date birthdate;

	public Swimmer() {
	}

	public Swimmer(String id) {
		this.id = id;
	}

	@Id
	public String getId() {
		return id;
	}

	public void setId(String id) {
		this.id = id;
	}

	public String getFirst() {
		return first;
	}

	public void setFirst(String first) {
		this.first = first;
	}

	public String getLast() {
		return last;
	}

	public void setLast(String last) {
		this.last = last;
	}

	public String getMiddle() {
		return middle;
	}

	public void setMiddle(String middle) {
		this.middle = middle;
	}

	public String getGender() {
		return gender;
	}

	public void setGender(String gender) {
		this.gender = gender;
	}

	public Date getBirthdate() {
		return birthdate;
	}

	public void setBirthdate(Date birthdate) {
		this.birthdate = birthdate;
	}

	public static long getSerialversionuid() {
		return serialVersionUID;
	}

	@Override
        public String toString() {
              return String.format("%s@%x; Id: %s; First: %s; Middle: %s; Last: %s; Gender: %s; Birthdate: %s;",
              this.getClass().getName(), this.hashCode(),
              getId(), getFirst(), getMiddle(), getLast(), getGender(), getBirthdate());
}

}

SwimmerService.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.service;

import java.util.List;

import org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model.Swimmer;

public interface SwimmerService {
public List<Swimmer> findSwimmers(String id);
public Swimmer findSwimmer(String id);
}

SwimmerServiceImpl.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.service;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.List;

import javax.persistence.EntityManager;
import javax.persistence.PersistenceContext;
import javax.persistence.Query;

import org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model.Swimmer;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;

@Service("swimmerService")
@Repository
public class SwimmerServiceImpl implements SwimmerService, Serializable {
	private static final long serialVersionUID = -7264545602862288436L;

	private EntityManager em;

	@PersistenceContext
	public void setEntityManager(EntityManager em) {
		this.em = em;
	}

	private Query findSwimmerQuery(String id) {
		return em.createQuery("select u from Swimmer u where u.id = :id")
				.setParameter("id", id);
	}

	@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
	public List<Swimmer> findSwimmers(String id) {
		List<Swimmer> list = null;

		if (id != null) {
			list = (List<Swimmer>) findSwimmerQuery(id).getResultList();
		}

		return list;
	}

	public Swimmer findSwimmer(String id) {
		Swimmer swimmer = null;

		if (id != null) {
			try {
				swimmer = (Swimmer) findSwimmerQuery(id).getSingleResult();
			} catch (Exception e) {
			}
		}

		return swimmer;
	}

}

Not just anyone can sign up for a user account. Only someone who’s eligible to participate in a swim meet can apply for an open lane. The process has to account for this when a prospective user signs up. I created an JSF Validator to check if the id given during sign-up matches an existing swimmer. If it does not then the Validator will throw an exception and the JSF form will catch it.

USwimmerValidator.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.faces.validator;

import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage;
import javax.faces.component.UIComponent;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.faces.validator.Validator;
import javax.faces.validator.ValidatorException;

import org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model.Swimmer;
import org.bwgz.swim.openlane.service.SwimmerService;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

@Component
public class USwimmerValidator implements Validator {

	@Autowired
	private SwimmerService service;

	public void setService(SwimmerService service) {
		this.service = service;
	}

	public void validate(FacesContext context, UIComponent component,
			Object value) throws ValidatorException {
		System.out.printf("USwimmerValidator.validate(%s, %s, %s)\n", context,
				component, value);
		System.out.printf("\t component.getId: %s\n", component.getId());
		System.out.printf("\t component.getClientId: %s\n",
				component.getClientId(context));
		System.out.printf("\t component.getContainerClientId: %s\n",
				component.getContainerClientId(context));
		System.out.printf("\t service: %s\n", service);

		Swimmer membership = service.findSwimmer((String) value);
		if (membership == null) {
			FacesMessage message = new FacesMessage();
			message.setSeverity(FacesMessage.SEVERITY_ERROR);
			message.setSummary("Swimmer not found.");
			message.setDetail("Swimmer not found.");
			context.addMessage(component.getClientId(context), message);
			throw new ValidatorException(message);
		}
	}
}

I decided to create a sub-flow to handle the sign up process. I also needed a backing bean for the sign up form. The heart of the flow involves capturing the username, email, password, and swimmer id in a JSF form, validating the input, and then creating the user account.

On start up the sub-flow instantiates a backing bean (signupBean) which will be used throughout the sub-flow and then discarded. A sign up page (signup.xhtml) is called by the view state and when the form on that page is submitted the flow will execute the action state adduser. adduser calls the User service to create a user record in the the database. If that succeeds the sub flow exits. If not, it takes the user back to the sign up form for another attempt. At anytime during the sub flow the user can exit by selecting a home link.

signup-flow.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<flow xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow"
	xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
	xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow
		http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow/spring-webflow-2.0.xsd">

	<on-start>
            <evaluate expression="signupBean" result="flowScope.signup" />
	</on-start>

	<view-state id="signup">
		<transition on="submit" to="adduser"/>
		<transition on="home" to="home"/>
	</view-state>

	<action-state id="adduser">
		<evaluate expression="userService.addUser(signup, swimmerService.findSwimmer(signup.usasId))" />
                <transition on="yes" to="success" />
                <transition on="no" to="signup" />
	</action-state>

	<end-state id="home"/>
	<end-state id="success"/>

</flow>

All the of input fields on the sign up page are validated. That validation is defined using annotations in Setup.java. There’s also the JSF Validator mentioned above. The user can’t get past the sign-up page unless they enter legitimate answers.

Setup.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model;

import java.io.Serializable;

import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.bean.RequestScoped;
import javax.validation.constraints.Pattern;
import javax.validation.constraints.Size;

@ManagedBean
@RequestScoped
public class SignUp implements Serializable {
	private static final long serialVersionUID = 4957886416619036377L;

	@Size(min = 5, max=20, message = "Please enter a valid username (5-20 characters)")
	private String username;

	@Size(min = 5, max=20, message = "Please enter a valid password (5-20 characters)")
	private String password;

	@Size(min = 1, message = "Please enter the Email")
	@Pattern(regexp = "[a-zA-Z0-9]+@[a-zA-Z0-9]+\\.[a-zA-Z0-9]+", message = "Email format is invalid.")
	private String email;

	@Size(min = 14, max=14, message = "Please enter a valid USA Swimming ID (14 characters)")
	@Pattern(regexp = "[a-zA-Z0-9]+", message = "USA Swimming ID format is invalid.")
	private String usasId;

	public SignUp() {
	}

	public String getUsername() {
		return username;
	}

	public void setUsername(String username) {
		this.username = username;
	}

	public String getEmail() {
		return email;
	}

	public void setEmail(String email) {
		this.email = email;
	}

	public String getUsasId() {
		return usasId;
	}

	public void setUsasId(String usasId) {
		this.usasId = usasId;
	}

	public String getPassword() {
		return password;
	}

	public void setPassword(String password) {
		this.password = password;
	}

    @Override
    public String toString() {
    	return String.format("%s@%x; Username: %s; Password: %s; Email: %s; UsasId: %s;",
    			this.getClass().getName(), this.hashCode(),
    			getUsername(), getPassword(), getEmail(), getUsasId());
    }
}

Here’s the the JSF form code from signup.xhtml.

<h:form id="signup">
	<h:outputLabel>User Name: </h:outputLabel>
	<h:inputText id="username" value="${signup.username}"/>
	<br/>
	<h:outputLabel>Password: </h:outputLabel>
	<h:inputText id="password" value="${signup.password}"/>
	<br/>
	<h:outputLabel>Your Email: </h:outputLabel>
	<h:inputText id="email" value="${signup.email}"/>
	<br/>
	<h:outputLabel>Your USA Swimming Id: </h:outputLabel>
	<h:inputText id="usasId" value="${signup.usasId}">
	    <f:validator binding="${USwimmerValidator}"/>
	</h:inputText>

	<br/>
	<h:commandButton id="submit" action="submit" value="Sign Up" update="@form" />
</h:form>

Note the validator tag on the Id inputText tag. I took me quite some time to get this to work correctly.

First, I created the Validator using @FacesValidator and  then added  @Autowired to the SwimmerService variable is needed during validation. It looked something like this.

@FacesValidator("swimmerValidator")
public class USwimmerValidator implements Validator {

    @Autowired
    private SwimmerService service;

This only half worked. The JSF form was able to execute the validator but SwimmerService was not set. After scouring the Internet I learned that the validator was know to JSF but not Spring. I had to drop @FacesValidator and go with @Component inside. This meant in the JSF form I needed to use binding instead of validatorId.

Second, my code original used a different Validator class name called USASMemberValidator. When I refactored it to SwimmerValidator the auto-wiring stopped working. I don’t know why. When I renamed it to USwimmerValidator everything worked fine. Something like this shouldn’t happen. This isn’t the first time in my career that I’ve seen something as flaky as this but it surprised me that I’d see it here.

While investigating all this I came across javax.inject (@Inject). I’m going to looking into this as an alternative.

Finally, I re-factored User by adding a Swimmer variable and annotating it with a one to one relationship. Here’s a snippet from User.java.

	@OneToOne(fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
	public Swimmer getSwimmer() {
		return swimmer;
	}

This is a unidirectional relationship and sufficient for now. I’ll probably re-factor it to a bidirectional relationship to provide some referential capabilities. I also need to ensure that when when a user record is deleted the associated swimmer record is not.

Next step is to get down to the business of an open lane application submission. More on that in my next Open Lane post.

As always, the code is available here on GitHub.

Open Lane – Sunday Housekeeping

April 16, 2012 Leave a comment

Up to now I’ve been focused on get Open Lane up and running. Today I went back and made it more manageable. I don’t want to get too far down the road without being able to build it from a shell using Maven. Also I don’t want to keep committing Eclipse specific files to my version code system Git. I want to be able to:

  • Download the latest version from github.
  • Build a war package using Maven.
  • Deploy that package to a Tomcat server and bring up Open Lane in a browser.
  • Generate an Eclipse project using Maven.

There’s plenty of  good Maven and Git documentation on the Internet. So I won’t get into the details on how to much to technologies work. With that in mind, I will highlight a few things.

The Maven pom file that comes with Spring Web Flow’s booking-faces sample was a good place to start. It very vanilla and doesn’t invoke exotic or highly customized commands or dependenicies. It expects the source tree to follow Maven defaults such as src/main/java. The only significant change was to add my application id’s and fix some the version in some Spring dependencies that were sharing the version.

	<groupId>org.bwgz.swim.openlane</groupId>
	<artifactId>open-lane</artifactId>
	<name>Open Lane</name>
	<version>0.0.1.RELEASE</version>

This results in a pom file that can be found here. After modifying my source tree the new pom could generate a war file and Eclipse project.

Command Description
mvn package Creates a war file in the target directory.
mvn eclipse:eclipse Creates an Eclipse project.

When creating the Eclipse project I found that I needed to ensure I didn’t have any old Eclipse directories hanging around. If I did then things didn’t go well when running the project in Eclipse.

The generated Eclipse project also defaults to Java 1.5 and Web 2.5. I’d prefer it to Java 1.6 or event 1.7 and Web 3.0. Those changes will come later.

During all of this I found a bug in home-flow.xml. The problem was with the evaluation expression …

expression="userService.findUser(currentUser.name)" result="viewScope.user"

Spring Web Flow (SWF) sets currentUser only if a user has been authenticated. Starting up the application on a clean install meant that no one was authenticated and in turn currentUser was not initialized (null). That caused my home flow to blow up because I was attempting to access a member of a null object. I fixed this by changing the expression to …

expression="currentUser != null ? userService.findUser(currentUser.name) : null"

This bug still perplexes me a bit because with the old code, if I logged out the user, there wasn’t a problem. I was as if currentUser was an empty (vs. null) object.

Open Lane – Supporting a User Part 2

April 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Having added some user authentication to my open lane application the next step involved associating the user with a profile. Things can start to get complex quickly when you need more than simple authentication and authorization. At lot of applications do not need their own form of user management because they’re part of a larger solution that already has it. Those application tap into the existing service for authentication and authorization. In our case we don’t have that. So there are a couple of options. I could add a separate user management service from another provider into the solution or I could write my own user management service.

At this point I don’t want to get into integrating with another solution. I’m sure that day will come but not today. For now I’m going to write some code that supports Spring Security and gives me enough of what I need to continue building out the application.

So what do I really need:

  1. My core user is a swimmer. Someone who will apply for an open lane swim. I’ll also need operational users such as an administrator but that can wait. I need to gather and store enough information about a swimmer to process the application. I’ll call this the user’s profile.
  2. A means to authentication a user via a login. I’ll be working with Spring Security to implement this.
  3. A means to secure pages and actions to authorized users. Again I’ll use Spring Security to implement this.
  4. A registration process to add new user.

In the previous post I used Spring’s in-memory UserDetailsService to handle authentication.

<security:authentication-manager>
	<security:authentication-provider>
		<security:password-encoder hash="md5" />
		<security:user-service>
			<security:user name="keith" password="417c7382b16c395bc25b5da1398cf076" authorities="ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR" />
			<security:user name="erwin" password="12430911a8af075c6f41c6976af22b09" authorities="ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR" />
			<security:user name="jeremy" password="57c6cbff0d421449be820763f03139eb" authorities="ROLE_USER" />
			<security:user name="scott" password="942f2339bf50796de535a384f0d1af3e" authorities="ROLE_USER" />
		</security:user-service>
	</security:authentication-provider>
</security:authentication-manager>

Given the Spring centricity of this application I’ll stick with Spring Security. The question is how to get authentication/authorization with customized user management. I’ve got specific profile information that I need to capture and store.

I could continue to use a Spring Security implementation and create a look aside table but this mean creating/updating two distinct elements when a change occurs. Or, I could subclass UserDetailsService but I’m concerned that this could be a rabbit hole that I don’t want to go down right now. Instead I’ll take a look at Spring Security’s JdbcDaoImpl. JdbcDaoImpl is an implementation of UserDetailsService which uses a database to fetch the authentication and authorization data.

<security:authentication-manager>
	<security:authentication-provider>
		<security:jdbc-user-service data-source-ref="dataSource"/>
		<security:password-encoder hash="md5" />
	</security:authentication-provider>
</security:authentication-manager>

When using JdbcDaoImpl you must ensure that you’ve correctly configured the database tables. You can find details on this here. I created two JPA entities – User,  and Authority. I’m using Hibernate on the backside.

User combines the fields that JdbcDaoImpl requires with user profile fields that the application needs.

User.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.Collection;

import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.FetchType;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.OneToMany;
import javax.persistence.Table;

@Entity
@Table(name = "Users")
public class User implements Serializable {
	private static final long serialVersionUID = -3475658623185783516L;

	private String username;
	private String password;
	private Boolean enabled;
	private String name;
	private String email;
	private String usasId;

	private Collection<Authority> authorities;

	public User() {
	}

	public User(String username, String name) {
		this.username = username;
		this.name = name;
	}

	@Id
	public String getUsername() {
		return username;
	}

	public void setUsername(String username) {
		this.username = username;
	}

	public String getName() {
		return name;
	}

	public void setName(String name) {
		this.name = name;
	}

	public String getEmail() {
		return email;
	}

	public void setEmail(String email) {
		this.email = email;
	}

	public String getUsasId() {
		return usasId;
	}

	public void setUsasId(String usasId) {
		this.usasId = usasId;
	}

	public String getPassword() {
		return password;
	}

	public void setPassword(String password) {
		this.password = password;
	}

	public Boolean getEnabled() {
		return enabled;
	}

	public void setEnabled(Boolean enabled) {
		this.enabled = enabled;
	}

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "username", fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
    public Collection<Authority> getAuthorities() {
        return authorities;
    }

	public void setAuthorities(Collection<Authority> authorities) {
		this.authorities = authorities;
	}

    @Override
    public String toString() {
    	return String.format("%s@%x; Username: %s; Password: %s; Enabled: %s; Authorities: %s; Name: %s; Email: %s; UsasId: %s;",
    			this.getClass().getName(), this.hashCode(),
    			getUsername(), getPassword(), getEnabled(), getAuthorities(),
    			getName(), getEmail(), getUsasId());
    }

}

Authority.java

package org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model;

import java.io.Serializable;

import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.Table;

@Entity
@Table(name = "Authorities")
public class Authority implements Serializable {
	private static final long serialVersionUID = -3475658623185783516L;

	private String username;
	private String authority;

	public Authority() {
	}

	public Authority(String username, String authority) {
		this.username = username;
		this.setAuthority(authority);
	}

	@Id
        public String getUsername() {
		return username;
	}

	public void setUsername(String username) {
		this.username = username;
	}

	public String getAuthority() {
		return authority;
	}

	public void setAuthority(String authority) {
		this.authority = authority;
	}

    @Override
    public String toString() {
    	return String.format("%s@%x; Username: %s; Authority: %s;", this.getClass().getName(), this.hashCode(), getUsername(), getAuthority());
    }

}

For now I’ll use an in-memory instance of HSQLDB to store my data. I initialize the tables with a SQL file that Hibernate loads when the application starts up.

import.sql

insert into Users (username, password, enabled, name, email, usasId) values ('keith', '417c7382b16c395bc25b5da1398cf076', TRUE, 'Keith Lee', 'keith@email.com', 'leemkei0891' )

insert into Authorities (username, authority) values ('keith', 'ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_SWIMMER' )

Now when I go to the profile page I can see that SWF’s currentUser and the user’s profile are set.

Current User: Name: keith
Credentials: [ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_SWIMMER]
Principal: org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.User@0: Username: keith; Password: [PROTECTED]; Enabled: true; AccountNonExpired: true; credentialsNonExpired: true; AccountNonLocked: true; Granted Authorities: ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_SWIMMER
Autorities: [ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_SWIMMER]
Details: org.springframework.security.web.authentication.WebAuthenticationDetails@255f8: RemoteIpAddress: 127.0.0.1; SessionId: 543BB337D17562B62F8CFFC8428272FB
User Profile: Object: org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model.User@3c8c7; Username: keith; Password: 417c7382b16c395bc25b5da1398cf076; Enabled: true; Authorities: [org.bwgz.swim.openlane.model.Authority@14bda9d; Username: keith; Authority: ROLE_USER, ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_SWIMMER;]; Name: Keith Lee; Email: keith@email.com; UsasId: leemkei0891;
Username: keith
Name: Keith Lee
Email: keith@email.com
UsasId: leemkei0891

Source code is available at github.

Open Lane – Supporting a User Part 1

April 13, 2012 Leave a comment

Open lane applications are restricted to swimmers already entered into the meet. A swimmer wanting to use the application first needs to establish their identity (register and login). The next iteration of the application adds the concept of a user to the application. User management, authentication, and authorization is a domain unto itself. This can become quite complex. At this early stage I’ll keep things simple and refactor as necessary later.

Spring Web Flow (SWF) provides a currentUser variable to access the authenticated principal. In this case principal relates to a Java object (UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken) that Spring Security provides.  In order to take advantage of currentUser I have to be in a flow. Most examples like booking-faces start the user on a non-flow page and then provides a link into a flow. I want to use currentUser on the home page so I’ll route the user directly into a flow.

index.html

<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Refresh" content="0; URL=spring/home">
</head>
</html>

home-flow.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<flow xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow"
	xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
	xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow
	http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow/spring-webflow-2.0.xsd">

	<view-state id="home"></view-state>
</flow>

home.xhtml

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
	xmlns:c="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core"
	xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
	xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

<f:view contentType="text/html">

<h:head>
	<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
	<title>Open Lane</title>
</h:head>
<h:body>
<h1>Open Lane</h1>
<table border="1">
	<tr>
	<td>
		<b>Date:</b>
	</td>
	<td>
		${currentDate}
	</td>
	</tr>

	<tr>
		<td>
			<b>Current User:</b>
		</td>
		<td>
			<c:if test="${not empty currentUser.name}">
			  	<b>Name:</b> ${currentUser.name}
			  	<br/>
				<b>Credentials:</b> ${currentUser.authorities}
			  	<br/>
				<b>Principal:</b> ${currentUser.principal}
			  	<br/>
				<b>Autorities:</b> ${currentUser.authorities}
			  	<br/>
				<b>Details:</b> ${currentUser.details}
			</c:if>
			<c:if test="${empty currentUser.name}">
				Name: none
			</c:if>
		</td>
	</tr>

	<tr>
		<td>
			<b>User Actions:</b>
		</td>
		<td>
			<c:if test="${not empty currentUser.name}">
				Logout
			</c:if>
			<c:if test="${empty currentUser.name}">
			   	Login | Register
			</c:if>
		</td>
	</tr>
</table>
</h:body>
</f:view>
</html>

When a user is logged in this JSF produces a informational table such as this:

Date: Thu Apr 12 16:48:04 CDT 2012
Current User: Name: keith
Credentials: [ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_USER]
Principal: org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.User@fd0ef400: Username: keith; Password: [PROTECTED]; Enabled: true; AccountNonExpired: true; credentialsNonExpired: true; AccountNonLocked: true; Granted Authorities: ROLE_SUPERVISOR,ROLE_USER
Autorities: [ROLE_SUPERVISOR, ROLE_USER]
Details: org.springframework.security.web.authentication.WebAuthenticationDetails@380f4: RemoteIpAddress: 127.0.0.1; SessionId: 627E651937975B65B3248F7AD3ED6F78
User Actions: Logout

Integrating SWF with Spring Security requires adding security configurations to the application. Here’s the important part.

<security:http auto-config="true" use-expressions="true">
    <security:form-login login-page="/spring/login" login-processing-url="/spring/loginProcess"
        default-target-url="/spring/home" authentication-failure-url="/spring/login?login_error=1" />
    <security:logout logout-url="/spring/logout" logout-success-url="/spring/home" />
    <security:intercept-url pattern="/secure" method="POST" access="hasRole('ROLE_SUPERVISOR')"/>
</security:http>

A call to /spring/loginProcess will route the flow to a login.xhtmllogin.xhtml presents the user with a login form. If the login is successful the flow is routed to /spring/home. A user will be logged out if the flow is later routed to /spring/logout. Here is the login.xhtml I took from booking-faces.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
    xmlns:c="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core"
    xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
    xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

<f:view contentType="text/html">

<h:head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
    <title>Open Lane</title>
</h:head>
<h:body>
<div>
    <p>Valid username/passwords are:</p>
    <ul>
        <li>keith/melbourne</li>
        <li>erwin/leuven</li>
        <li>jeremy/atlanta</li>
        <li>scott/rochester</li>
    </ul>
</div>
<div>
    <c:if test="${not empty param.login_error}">
        <div class="error">
            Your login attempt was not successful, try again.<br />
            Reason: #{sessionScope.SPRING_SECURITY_LAST_EXCEPTION.message}
        </div>
    </c:if>
    <form name="f" action="${request.contextPath}/spring/loginProcess" method="post">
        <fieldset>
            <legend>Login Information</legend>
                <p>
                    User:
                    <br />
                    <c:if test="${not empty param.login_error}">
                        <c:set var="username" value="${sessionScope.SPRING_SECURITY_LAST_USERNAME}"/>
                    </c:if>
                    <input type="text" name="j_username" value="#{username}"/>
                </p>
                <p>
                    Password:
                    <br />
                    <input type="password" name="j_password" />
                </p>
                <p>
                    <input type="checkbox" name="_spring_security_remember_me"/>
                    Don't ask for my password for two weeks:
                </p>
                <p>
                    <input name="submit" type="submit" value="Login" />
                </p>
        </fieldset>
    </form>
</div>
</h:body>
</f:view>
</html>

With all this in place I’ll now change to the “User Action” on my home page to present either a login or logout link based on the currentUser. Here’s is the change to home.xhtml.

<tr>
    <td>
        <b>User Actions:</b>
    </td>
    <td>
        <c:if test="${not empty currentUser.name}">
            Welcome, ${currentUser.name} | <a href="${request.contextPath}/spring/logout">Logout</a>
        </c:if>
        <c:if test="${empty currentUser.name}">
             <a href="${request.contextPath}/spring/login">Login</a>
        </c:if>
    </td>
</tr>

Now I can login and logout at user. Source code is available at github.

Open Lane Gets a Face

April 12, 2012 Leave a comment

JSFAdding JSF to my open lane application was very straight forward. The JSF Integration chapter of the Spring Web Flow Reference Guide has all the steps. The integration involved:

  • Modifying the web configuration files to support JSF.
  • Adding the spring-faces, jsf-api, and jsf-impl libraries.
  • Adding a JSF configuration file faces-config.xml.
  • Adding a JSF file. I added test.xhtml (see below) to the flows directory.
  • I’ve also removed my test view resolver.

Now my flow requests get routed to a JSF resolver. The request http://localhost:8080/open-lane/spring/test now executes the following JSF:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
	xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
	xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

<f:view contentType="text/html">

<h:head>
	<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
	<title>Open Lane - Test</title>
</h:head>
<h:body>
This is a test.
</h:body>
</f:view>
</html>

Source code is available at github.

Notes:

¹I did some house keeping with the code. You may have noticed that the URL has changed..

Categories: Java, JSF, Spring, Spring Web Flow

Open Lane: Starting Out With Spring Web Flow

April 11, 2012 Leave a comment

My son’s swim club hosts Minnesota’s largest swim meet. Swim meets such as this provide an opportunity for swimmers already entered into the meet to apply for an exhibition entry into events that do not use all the lanes the pool provides. In Minnesota this is called an open lane swim. The process for managing open lane entries can be quite time consuming. An online system for handling open lanes applications would significantly reduce this.

The initial requirements are:

  • User self service:
    • Create a user.
    • User login and logout.
    • Edit user profile.
    • Search for an event.
    • Manage open lane entry applications (i.e. view, add, delete).
  • Reporting:
    • List all open lane entries by swimmer and event.
  • Data initialization utility – loads meet information into the application’s database.

Since I’ve been using the Spring  framework on and off for some time now I decided to use Spring Web Flow (SWF) to build this application.

Spring Web Flow is a Spring MVC extension that allows implementing the “flows” of a web application. A flow encapsulates a sequence of steps that guide a user through the execution of some business task. It spans multiple HTTP requests, has state, deals with transactional data, is reusable, and may be dynamic and long-running in nature.

The sweet spot for Spring Web Flow are stateful web applications with controlled navigation such as checking in for a flight, applying for a loan, shopping cart checkout, or even adding a confirmation step to a form.

That sounds like just the kind of framework I need. I’ll be using a full open source stack that includes:

  • Apache Tomcat
  • Spring Web Flow
  • JSF using Primefaces
  • Hibernate
  • BIRT
  • An open source RDBMS such as MySQL
Eclipse is my IDE of choice and I should be able to build everything using Maven. While I could use an IDE such as SpringSource Tools Suite (STS) to auto generate and build much of my application I’ve decided to take a ground up approach. I don’t want an auto-magically development environment hiding the minutia from me.  That scenario is great once you’re fluent with the technology. It can be deadly when you first attempt to do something practical with it. When something doesn’t work it’s often frustrating and time consuming to resolve it.
Spring Faces- Hotel Booking Sample Application

Spring Faces- Hotel Booking Sample Application

I start out by downloading the latest version of Spring Web Flow 2.3.1. It contains a sample application called booking-faces. I built the application (to ensure it would in fact build) and then generated an eclipse project using maven:

  • mvn package
  • mvn eclipse:clean
  • mvn eclipse:eclipse

From Eclipse I imported the application into a workspace and using a Tomcat server started up the application. It all worked! I now had a reference point from which I could start coding my application.

Creating Dynamic Web Application

Creating Dynamic Web Application

Using Eclipse Java EE IDE for Web Developers (Indigo SR2) I created a dynamic web project call open-lane.  This gave me an blank web application to start from. I dropped a simple “hello word” static index.html file into webapp, ran it up with Tomcat, and successfully opened the link from from my browser. Now comes the fun part of getting all the necessary SWF bits into the project.

In general, a SWF application contains one or more flows. Flows are comprised of states (steps). SWF is based on a finite-state machine. The idea being that the application can transition (navigate) from one state to another based upon an event. A state typically has a view. I’ll start with the most primitive of applications – an application with one state. My flow definition will look like this.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<flow xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow"
	xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
	xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow
	http://www.springframework.org/schema/webflow/spring-webflow-2.0.xsd">

	<view-state id="test"></view-state>
</flow>

To successfully launch an SWF application I need to create a configuration that fulfills the following:

SWF components

Spring Web Flow Components¹

Spring MVC’s DispatcherServlet will be configured to route incoming flow requests to SWF.

<!-- The master configuration file for this Spring web application -->
<context-param>
	<param-name>contextConfigLocation</param-name>
	<param-value>
		/WEB-INF/config/web-application-config.xml
	</param-value>
</context-param>

<!-- The front controller of this Spring Web application, responsible for
	handling all application requests -->
<servlet>
	<servlet-name>Spring MVC Dispatcher Servlet</servlet-name>
	<servlet-class>org.springframework.web.servlet.DispatcherServlet</servlet-class>
	<init-param>
		<param-name>contextConfigLocation</param-name>
		<param-value></param-value>
	</init-param>
	<load-on-startup>2</load-on-startup>
</servlet>

The configuration coming from web-application-config.xml maps DispatcherServlet requests to a application resource handler.

<!-- Enables FlowHandler URL mapping -->
<bean class="org.springframework.webflow.mvc.servlet.FlowHandlerAdapter">
    <property name="flowExecutor" ref="flowExecutor" />
</bean>

Next I define how FlowHandlerAdapter will map a resource path it receives from DispatcherServlet to a flow id. The normal convention has FlowHandlerAdapter searching the flow registry for a matching id. If it finds one then it will either start a new flow or continue an existing one.

<!-- Maps request paths to flows in the flowRegistry;
     e.g. a path of /a/b looks for a flow with id "a/b" -->
<bean class="org.springframework.webflow.mvc.servlet.FlowHandlerMapping">
    <property name="flowRegistry" ref="flowRegistry"/>
    <property name="order" value="0"/>
</bean>

In order to query a flow from the flow registry one has to exist. This directs the registry to use flows defined in /WEB-INF/flows. For example, WEB-INF/flows/testing/test/test-flow.xml. It also defines the id of the service used to build these flows.

<!-- Register all Web Flow definitions under /WEB-INF/flows/**/*-flow.xml -->
<webflow:flow-registry id="flowRegistry"
    base-path="/WEB-INF/flows"
    flow-builder-services="flowBuilderServices">
    <webflow:flow-location-pattern value="/**/*-flow.xml" />
</webflow:flow-registry>

Now things get interesting. SWF provides several flow builder services and you can create your own. The one you choice will bring in the conventions and overhead associated with the service. For example, using a JSF builder service means that:

  • All the necessary JSF libraries and dependencies must be available to the application. This usually means including them in the application packaging.
  • The application is configured for JSF.
  • Views (pages) will be written in JSF.

In other words, welcome to the world of JSF.

To get things started I didn’t want to complicate my first application with JSF or JSP. I’m just trying to ensure that the plumbing is working. While that meant writing a bit of Java code I decided it was the lesser of two evils.

<bean id="viewResolver"
    class="org.springframework.web.servlet.view.UrlBasedViewResolver">
    <property name="viewClass" value="org.bwgz.test.TestUrlBasedView"/>
</bean>

<!-- Deploy a flow executor -->
<webflow:flow-executor id="flowExecutor" />

<!-- Configure flow builder services -->
<!-- Configure view service -->
<webflow:flow-builder-services id="flowBuilderServices"
    view-factory-creator="mvcViewFactoryCreator" />

<!-- Use the test View Resolver -->
<bean id="mvcViewFactoryCreator"
   class="org.springframework.webflow.mvc.builder.MvcViewFactoryCreator">
   <property name="viewResolvers" ref="viewResolver"/>
</bean>

In this instance the flow builder service will use MvcViewFactoryCreator and it will in turn use UrlBasedViewResolver and my TestUrlBasedView to generate the view. I don’t do much in TestUrlBasedView. Just dump out some variables and get out of Dodge City.

package org.bwgz.test;

import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;

import org.springframework.web.servlet.view.AbstractUrlBasedView;

public class TestUrlBasedView extends AbstractUrlBasedView {
	@Override
	protected void renderMergedOutputModel(Map<String, Object> model,
			HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws Exception {

		Set<?> keys = model.keySet();
		Iterator<?> iterator = keys.iterator();

		System.out.printf("url: %s\n", getUrl());

		while (iterator.hasNext()) {
			Object key = iterator.next();

			System.out.printf("key: %s  value: %s\n", key.toString(), model.get(key));
		}
	}
}

In my browser I go to http://localhost:8080/open-lane/spring/testing/test and Tomcat dumps the following output to the console.

url: test
key: flashScope  value: map[[empty]]
key: flowRequestContext  value: [RequestControlContextImpl@1455cf4 externalContext = org.springframework.webflow.mvc.servlet.MvcExternalContext@d9b071, currentEvent = [null], requestScope = map[[empty]], attributes = map[[empty]], messageContext = [DefaultMessageContext@1ceebfa sourceMessages = map[[null] -> list[[empty]]]], flowExecution = [FlowExecutionImpl@1e6743e flow = 'testing/test', flowSessions = list[[FlowSessionImpl@d9ceea flow = 'testing/test', state = 'test', scope = map['viewScope' -> map[[empty]]]]]]]
key: flowExecutionKey  value: e1s1
key: flowExecutionUrl  value: /open-lane/spring/testing/test?execution=e1s1
key: currentUser  value: null
key: viewScope  value: map[[empty]]

I could get a little fancier by modifying my flow to:

<view-state id="test" view="/index-static.html">

And adding this line to the end of TestUrlBasedView:

request.getRequestDispatcher(getUrl()).forward(request, response);

That forwards my browser to a static html file in my application.

All the plumbing appears to be in place. Here are all the SWF libraries and dependencies I needed.

  • commons-logging-1.1.1.jar
  • spring-asm-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-beans-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-binding-2.3.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-context-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-core-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-expression-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-js-2.3.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-web-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-webflow-2.3.1.RELEASE.jar
  • spring-webmvc-3.1.1.RELEASE.jar

Time to get out of the minutia. The next post on Open Lane will introduce JSF into the application.

Source code is available at github.

Notes:

¹Spring Web Flow Components diagram from Tutorial: Build a Shopping Cart with Spring Web Flow 2.0.